Quebec wants better garlic harvesting laws

Quebec wants better garlic harvesting laws

As wild garlic prepares to emerge from the ground, the Quebec government is reminding those who might be tempted to harvest it that this vulnerable plant is strongly regulated by law to ensure its preservation. Intensive harvesting and the destruction of its habitat, particularly by agricultural activities and urban development, have greatly affected the plant’s survival, which is why the sale and harvesting of wild garlic for commercial purposes have been prohibited since 1995. Harvesting for personal use is also restricted to a maximum of 200 grams, 50 bulbs or 50 plants per person, per year, in addition to being prohibited in protected natural environments, the Quebec Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food (MAPAQ) said in a press releases.…

BC judge sentences man to 1 year in jail for contempt of court

BC judge sentences man to 1 year in jail for contempt of court

A provincial court judge in Prince Rupert, BC, has sentenced a 46-year-old man to a year in jail for contempt of court, ruling he tried to circumvent the justice system with “pseudo-legal” and “stupid” arguments . Judge David Paterson sentenced Cameron Hardy, in part to deter others from subjecting the court to the theory known as “organized pseudo-legal commercial arguments.” Paterson’s ruling details how Hardy, who was facing a charge of resisting or obstructing a peace officer in 2021, considers himself a “freeman,” meaning he won’t accept that courts have jurisdiction over him and falsely believes Canadian law doesn’t apply to him.…

Going to court without a lawyer?  DIY law is on the rise

Going to court without a lawyer? DIY law is on the rise

When Farrah Jinha’s 15-year marriage failed, she never imagined it would result in an eight-year legal battle, culminating in 2021 with an 18-day trial pitting her — alone — against her ex-husband’s professional legal team. But faced with a $200,000 retainer fee that needed to be paid to keep her lawyer, Jinha says she was forced to take over her divorce proceedings in the BC Supreme Court. “I was scared, for sure, but I was also very determined to get this done, because the sense of injustice was just too big,” said the 53-year-old, who now lives in Toronto. “I gave up my career.…

Do you have a Blended Family?  The Advantages and Disadvantages to Mutual Wills

Do you have a Blended Family? The Advantages and Disadvantages to Mutual Wills

A common concern when a parent enters into a new relationship is how to ensure their children from a previous marriage will be adequately taken care of at the time of their death. While the common answer is to enter into a mutual will, there may be some hidden dangers a parent has not thought of as an alternative arrangement which may be more suitable. What is a mutual will? A mutual will is a contractual agreement between at least two people who agree to draft their wills on similar terms, which the parties agree upon. This prevents either party from revoking or amending their will without the other party’s agreement.…

‘Keira’s Law’ passes the Senate, signaling a change to the way courts approach domestic violence

‘Keira’s Law’ passes the Senate, signaling a change to the way courts approach domestic violence

A private member’s bill requiring that judges consider domestic violence and coercive control when issuing decisions passed the Senate on Tuesday evening. Bill C-233, which was sponsored by Liberal MP Anju Dhillon, was introduced in February 2022. It was dubbed “Keira’s Law” after four-year-old Keira Kagan, who was found dead with her father at the bottom of a cliff outside of Toronto in 2020. Keira’s mother, Jennifer Kagan-Viater, said at a press conference on Wednesday morning that she tried to call attention to the danger her daughter’s father presented to their child well before their death. She said she went to court to seek protection for Keira from the violent and coercive behavior of her ex-husband Robin Brown.…

Canada’s Senate passes Keira’s Law aimed at educating decision-makers on domestic violence

Canada’s Senate passes Keira’s Law aimed at educating decision-makers on domestic violence

Descrease article font size Increase article font size Canada’s senate has passed a bill aimed at educating judges about the dangers of domestic violence and coercive control. ‘Keira’s Law,’ Bill C-233, was introduced by Anju Dhillon, member of Parliament for Dorval—Lachine—LaSalle in 2022 on the second anniversary of Keira Kagan’s death in Milton, Ont. The legislation focuses on protection for children of abusive ex-partners via amendments to the Judges Act. It adds continuous education for decision-makers on the finer points of violence and control in family relationships. Additionally, justices are now expected to consider whether a release order for an accused is in the interests of the safety and security.…

Pakistan election panel seeks change in law guiding its powers |  Elections News

Pakistan election panel seeks change in law guiding its powers | Elections News

In a letter to parliament, ECP chief says ‘judicial overbearing’ has ‘diluted the writ’ of the panel in holding free and fair elections. Islamabad, Pakistan – Pakistan’s election panel is seeking a legislative amendment to remove the president’s role in deciding the dates for general polls amid a continuing political crisis in the country. Sikandar Sultan Raja, the head of the Election Commission of Pakistan (ECP), on Monday sent a five-page letter to the National Assembly Speaker Raja Pervaiz Ashraf and Senate Chairman Sadiq Sanjrani, requesting the amendment to the law guiding the panel’s powers. The suggested amendment says the ECP wants to be the sole authority to announce or change election schedules without any political interference.…

Okanagan flood compensation claims a ‘complex factual and legal landscape’

Okanagan flood compensation claims a ‘complex factual and legal landscape’

Breadcrumb Trail Links News Local News Emergency bridge removal on Duteau Creek that cuts off mobile home pad leads to lengthy legal fight Published April 10, 2023 • Last updated 5 days ago • 3 minute read The Supreme Court of BC in Vancouver. Photo by Margarita-Young /Getty Images/iStockphoto Article content A Supreme Court of BC official says a flood compensation case from 2017 in Lumby has created a complex factual and legal landscape that remains unresolved. Advertisements 2 This advertisement has not been loaded yet, but your article continues below. THIS CONTENT IS RESERVED FOR SUBSCRIBERS ONLY Subscribe now to read the latest news in your city and across Canada.…