Facebook loses legal challenge at EU’s top court

Facebook loses legal challenge at EU’s top court

LONDON – Facebook lost a legal challenge Tuesday at the European Union’s top court over a groundbreaking German anti-trust decision that limited the way the company uses data for advertising. The European Court of Justice said competition watchdogs can consider whether companies like Facebook comply with the continent’s strict privacy rules, which are normally enforced by national data privacy regulators. The court ruled that antitrust authorities can take into account any violations of data privacy rules as they investigate whether tech giants are abusing their dominance in the market by boxing out competitors. “We are evaluating the court’s decision and will have more to say in due course,” Facebook parent Meta said in a statement.…

Unfair Contract Terms change: Is your business ready?

Unfair Contract Terms change: Is your business ready?

In late 2022, the Treasury Laws Amendment (More Competition, Better Prices) Bill 2022 passed both houses of the federal parliament. The relevant laws take effect from 9 November 2023 and significantly bolster the Unfair Contract Terms (UCT) regime in Australia.For business owners and managers who are unfamiliar with the UCT regime, now is the time to revisit these laws. Unfair Contract TermsUCT laws have been in place since 2010 for consumer contracts, and since 2016 for ‘small business contracts’.The purpose of the UCT laws is to prevent reliance on unfair terms in standard form contracts when dealing with consumers and small businesses.…

Canada’s Online News Act Targets Facebook and Google

Canada’s Online News Act Targets Facebook and Google

The Canadian Parliament has passed a law that will require technology companies to pay domestic news outlets for linking to their articles, prompting the owner of Facebook and Instagram to say that it would pull news articles from both platforms in the country. The law, passed on Thursday, is the latest salvo in a push by governments around the world to force big companies like Google and Facebook to pay for news that they share on their platforms — a campaign that the companies have resisted at virtually every turn. With some caveats, the new Canadian law would force search engines and social media companies to engage in a bargaining process — and binding arbitration, if necessary — for licensing news content for their use.…

This scientist shaped a new law that moves Canada away from toxicity testing on animals

This scientist shaped a new law that moves Canada away from toxicity testing on animals

For decades, researchers have relied on animals to test whether chemicals are toxic to humans. But science has developed alternatives, and a new Canadian law will require them to move in those directions. This week, Bill S-5 was passed by the Senate and was given a royal assent. It includes language that brings Canada closer to “modernized toxicity testing,” according to a Windsor researcher who helped shape the legislation. Charu Chandrasekera says laboratories of the future will be forced to turn to other methods to determine whether chemicals are safe — instead of using rats, mice and dogs. Windsor Morning7:42Animal Testing For decades, researchers have relied on animals to test whether chemicals are toxic to humans.…

Residential schools: Report on denialism in Canada

Residential schools: Report on denialism in Canada

OTTAWA – Canada should give “urgent consideration” to legal mechanisms as a way to combat residential school denialism, says a new report from the independent special interlocutor on unmarked graves. Justice Minister David Lambetti said he was open to such a solution. Kimberly Murray made the call in an interim report released Friday, just over a year after she was appointed to an advisory role focused on how Ottawa can help Indigenous communities search for children who died and disappeared from residential schools. The former executive director of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada spent much of the past year traveling the country and hearing from different communities, experts and survivors.…

ChatGPT: Lawyers say AI tricked them into citing bogus case law

ChatGPT: Lawyers say AI tricked them into citing bogus case law

NEW YORK – Two apologetic lawyers responding to an angry judge in Manhattan federal court blamed ChatGPT Thursday for tricking them into including fictitious legal research in a court filing. Attorneys Steven A. Schwartz and Peter LoDuca are facing possible punishment over a filing in a lawsuit against an airline that included references to past court cases that Schwartz thought were real, but were actually invented by the artificial intelligence-powered chatbot. Schwartz explained that he used the groundbreaking program as he hunted for legal precedents supporting a client’s case against the Colombian airline Avianca for an injury incurred on a 2019 flight.…

Kahnawake was unimpressed with consultations on Quebec Indigenous language law

Kahnawake was unimpressed with consultations on Quebec Indigenous language law

The Kanien’kehá:ka (Mohawk) community on Montreal’s South Shore has joined the growing number of groups against Quebec’s proposed Indigenous languages ​​bill, criticizing the CAQ government’s “ingenuine consultation process.” The Mohawk Council of Kahnawake has been critical of François Legault’s government’s Bill 96 (An Act respecting French, the official and common language of Quebec) since it was tabled and is also objecting to the government’s proposed Indigenous languages ​​law. “Quebec’s tactic is to propose legislation in an effort to mitigate negative impacts from how Bill 96 was forced into law,” said MCK Grand Chief Kahsennenhawe Sky-Deer. “History has shown that consultation is just a tool external governments use as a checkbox mechanism to say that Indigenous Peoples have been consulted and pass their legislation as planned.…

Manitoba lawyers will be required to take an Indigenous culture course

Manitoba lawyers will be required to take an Indigenous culture course

Manitoba lawyers will soon have to take mandatory training on Indigenous rights and history as part of a new requirement from the Law Society of Manitoba. The one-time, mandatory training is a new requirement from the Law Society of Manitoba, which regulates the legal profession in the province, to ensure all lawyers in Manitoba have a common knowledge base on Indigenous issues, said Alissa Schacter, equity officer and policy counsel for the Law Society of Manitoba. The law society believes having this education is a matter of competence, she said. “Lawyers need to have this understanding of the place that we live, its history and the people who lived here prior to European contact in order to be able to assist their clients and represent them effectively,” she said.…